Friday, 23 September 2016

Tomorrow, Kevin Smith can return to being a nobody

There is really no doubt about the result, and after tomorrow Kevin Smith, who has challenged Corbyn for the Labour leadership, can return to being an unknown nobody. 

The Labour party, however, is not the organisation it was a year ago. Fraser Nelson in the Telegraph provides a pretty good account of what's been going on. What I've not yet seen in print is anyone analysing the political asymmetry of a Tory party with clear public support but probably barely 100k members left and a Labour movement with 600k members but little widespread support. But this will have consequences, no doubt. 

The Libdems are now just a pungent smear on the green benches; broke, with fewer members, they were gambling on getting Tax funding based on their 2010 vote share, an establishment fix strongly pursued by both Hayden Phillips and Christopher Kelly. That's now dead in the water thank goodness and the LibDems are stuffed.   

Changes ahead - and changes mean opportunities to overturn even more old-establishment inanities, cause Polly to froth at the mouth, and reclaim our realm.

Wednesday, 21 September 2016

Dave's 70,000 imaginary friends exposed

Poor Cameron. No sooner has he left office than all his closest chums have been turfed out, his chum-friendly policies have been reversed and now a series of Commons committees are publishing reports criticising his record

The latest, from the Defence committee, catalogues Dave's massive fails over Syria. First, it challenged him to identify the 70,000 chums he claimed to have in Syria. The poor chap from the MoD left to answer for him whilst he enjoys a fourth Summer holiday was flummoxed. Perhaps the figure was a little high. And there must be moderate rebels, mustn't there? Stands to reason. No, we don't know who any of them are. 

The Committee was also critical of the RAF's air campaign, Operation Overwhelming Victory. Air Vice Marshal Crispin Undercarriage stated that our three aircraft in theatre has done 'splendidly', having been in flying condition at least 50% of the time, and only 37 similar aircraft in the UK that had been cannibalised for parts were now unflyable. We have attacked 26 targets in the past year, and scored the highest number of hits against man-propelled biwheeled attack vehicles (MAPBAVS), using our unique Very Small Missiles that cost only half a mill a pop. He disclosed that our three pilots were managed by just six Air Commodores and AVMs and a staff of seventy in the UK and praised the efficiency of the operation. It would have been better, he admitted, had we been able to co-ordinate with friendly forces on the ground, but the Prime Minister had declined to identify any of his 70,000 chums on security grounds. 

A spokesperson for the ex Prime Minister declined to address specific points, saying "Mr Cameron is very busy right now with a Strawberry Mivvie. We'll get back to you."

Tuesday, 20 September 2016

The limits of State 'warnings'?

There was absolutely nothing surprising in the facts as they emerged that the NYC terrorist bomber turned out to be an Afghan Islamist. The only cause of mild wonder was why the MSM didn't feel confident about calling it earlier - social media was straight on the button. 

No, the real story for me was the government alert sent to all owners of iPhones. Using the phones' location settings, alerts were sent to every iPhone in the NY area, presumably causing some surprise to Apple mobile owners who hadn't twigged that the gub'ment can address them directly. Presumably they can refine the phone locations down to New Jersey, or Manhatten, or even to just 5th Avenue; "Take shelter - poor black rioters approaching". Apple have included an option to turn the alerts off, but will that switch always be there? EU owners of iPhones will not be reassured that EU phones have the same alerts-receiving capacity, but no option to turn them off. Juncker is probably squirming in excitement. 

This isn't tinfoil hat territory. I'm perfectly happy with the danger warning sirens here in the valley, which scared the life out of me the first time I heard them tested (every Saturday at noon). It's also useful to know the code - three 5 second blasts to call the volunteer fire brigade out. If nothing else, everyone puts on their trousers in the middle of the night and goes outside to see whose barn is on fire. It's a sort of community event. 

And I remember rather fondly the public safety films that were broadcast last thing at night on the TV at 11pm, just before the closing-down rendition of the national anthem. "What to do if you catch fire" was one of my favourites; "Lay down, roll over and put it out" was the answer, which I have always remembered, though in almost six decades I've never actually caught fire. 

But the government sending me geo-focused alerts on my mobile? Maybe it's just age, but that's almost as creepy as having Islamist killers in our midst.

Sunday, 18 September 2016

From African fishing grounds to EU milk factories

Following from several of the superb and well-informed comments to the post below, I recommend a piece in today's Indie on the rape of African fish stocks. 

It's not perfect. The author for example in writing "Fishmeal plants in Senegal typically produce just 200 kg of fishmeal powder from one tonne of wet fish, protein that would otherwise be destined for human mouths in one of the hungriest regions on earth." clearly has little idea that what fishmeal plants actually do is to de-water the 80% water content of milled fish prepatory to transport. 

We're far from the 1970s, when battery eggs in the UK had yolks glowing bright orange with Xanthophyll and tasting strongly of fish from the crudely compounded feeds. Now the fish are fed to factory cows in vast, automated robotic farms using mutant and deformed Fresians as living milk plants, and technology has made the milk utterly tasteless as well as pulversing the fat globules down to a size in which our tongues not only cannot taste the rotten-fat taste of sour milk but the milk takes three times as long, once rotten, to de-emulsify. So filling stations can sell milk that can be six weeks old by the time you pour it over your cornflakes.*

And of course EU farmers maximising their CAP incomes can supplement the cows' staple feed of fish with silage or hay cut from the deserted and wildlife-barren meadows  surrounding the cow plants, so long as they soak them in enough nitrate fertilizer, pesticides and herbicides. 



* Until you come here - where milk is fresh, local and just pasteurised and tastes like milk tasted when you were a kid (not the free 1/3 pint stale vomit-flavoured wastings that were sold to schools but the real stuff your mum bought).